Discoid lupus erythematosus is a condition of the skin that generates localized or widespread circular lesions.  Discoid lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune condition.  Instead of protecting the body against infectious organisms, certain dysfunctions from the immune system cause it to attack healthy cells and tissues,  producing skin lesions in children.  Your skin lesions, brought on by discoid lupus erythematosus, can become worse with prolonged exposure to the sun.  Most patients have localized skin lesions, predominantly on body regions exposed to sunlight: scalp, face, neck and arms.

However, some patients have skin lesions on unexposed regions of the body: chest, back or legs.  These lesions can indicate the development of systemic lupus erythematosus, which involves serious abnormalities from the immune system.

While individuals with discoid lupus erythematosus mostly present recurring skin conditions, patients identified as having systemic lupus erythematosus can cultivate an array of diseases: cardiovascular diseases, tuberculosis, pneumonia, disorders from the G.I. tract, and diseases of the musculoskeletal or nervous systems.

Discoid lupus erythematosus is very common in women aged  18 to 50, yet kids lupus can occur as well.  The skin disorder has the highest incidence in African Americans (esp. women) who commonly experience more intense symptoms of discoid lupus erythematosus.  Although actual causes of the disorder haven’t been identified, multiple inter-related factors are suspected for triggering the condition:

  • genetic factors (inherited genetic abnormalities)
  • hormonal factors (excessive amounts of estrogen are indicated)
  • environmental factors (prolonged medical treatments with antibiotics)

Note:  With discoid lupus erythematosus, a majority of affected people have a family history from the disorder.

The entire process of diagnosing discoid lupus erythematosus involves physical examination, laboratory analysis of skin samples and elaborate blood tests.  If lab tests reveal dysfunction of defense mechanisms, and the skin lesions are linked to discoid lupus erythematosus, the patients will be prescribed a suitable medical treatment.

And even though this disorder can’t be completely overcome with the type of treatments currently available, discoid lupus erythematosus could be controlled, and its generated symptoms can be ameliorated. Patients diagnosed with discoid lupus erythematosus have to avoid exposure to sunlight, in order to be able to prevent aggravation of their skin lesions.

In early stages of discoid lupus erythematosus, your skin lesions have a reddish, circular aspect and the borders of the affected skin present sharp prominences.  In time, the skin can become scaly and crusty.   When discoid lupus erythematosus affects the scalp, the disorder often involves temporary (as well as permanent) hair thinning.

Black patients are exposed to a high risk of developing cancer of the skin; they should take special measures in avoiding sun burns.  By using treatments (& by avoiding prolonged contact with sunlight), the skin disorder could be kept in check and its symptoms could be considerably ameliorated.

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Further Resources:

Lupus in Kids (High Authority Site)

Characteristics of Lupus

From Mayo CLinic (Article) – Increased Risk of Infection & Other Complications in Kids with Lupus

DLE in children (from official high authority site)

 

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